OUR LOCATION - Aber Falls Whisky Distillery

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MOUTH OF THE RIVER

Translated from Welsh, Abergwyngregyn literally means Mouth of the river of the white shells. This small village is a key tourist destination, attracting 50-60,000 tourists each year, with its proximity to Rhaeadr Fawr (Aber Falls) making it the perfect starting point for a gentle trek up the mountain.

Historically, Abergwyngregyn was most well known for its links with Welsh royalty, and was home to one of the prince’s favourite residences. With the whole village being auctioned in 1925, everything is now privately owned, and is home to around 200 residents.

Abergwyngregyn is a small picturesque village, but it’s scenery, landscape features and views across the Menai Straits towards Beaumaris, Penmon and Puffin Island, make it a beautiful place for both locals and those wishing to visit explore what the North Wales Coast has to offer. Whether you fancy a picnic or a hike with a view, there’s plenty to explore around Abergwyngregyn.

Abergwyngregyn has a long and interesting history, but it is also home to a thriving local community which looks to the future as well as to the past. Not only is it home to our brand new Visitor Centre, which we see as a hub for Welsh tourism in North Wales, but it’s also home to Anafon Hydro, a recently installed hydro electric energy scheme which provides power to the national grid, with some of the money raised benefiting local charity projects.

The water from the Falls plunges 120ft before forming Afon Rhaeadr Fawr (Aber Falls River), which runs right alongside the distillery. You can walk up to the falls in less than an hour from one of the car parks in Abergwyngregyn, and witness the majesty of this stunning waterfall.

The Menai Strait, or Afon Menai as it is known to locals, is the narrow body of water that separates Anglesey from mainland Wales, and is a beautifully scenic part of the country. There are two bridges, the Menai Suspension and the Brittania, and the water between the two structures is known as ‘the swellies’; an environment that’s no stranger to whirlpools, strong, reversing tidal currents and fast-moving currents. The Menai is also an area that has a rich variety of marine habitats, and is formally recognised as a Special Area for Conservation.